Platypus Nganhing Na Za Ngei Ziam


Platypus te ii mei sia pheak in, apeang sia ngumpai ii peang taw kibang hi. Tui op leh amai peangte nii taw, tui seau aa, amei taw apai nopna sang heak thei hi.

Amate nguak tang tat thei in, Australia ngam saksang Tasmania thangsang ah tuithiangna mun ah om uh hi.

Letmat 15 bangh sau aa, amei sia letmat 5  pha in , angitna sia 3 lbs. (1.4 kg) bangh pha aa, tuilumna ngam ate sia tuivotna ngam ate sang in no zaw uh hi.

Lungno, nganhing no thankhiik , vacim no ngasa no ci te pawl man in ne hi.


Apeang tungah mawl om in, mihingte in tua mawl thutha leang nguu nei aa citum thei hi. Athalup nop nganhingno khat sia tua a mawl taw ma that lumh in ne hi.

A huuk hun sia June-Oct sung hi aa, kumh 2 bangh pha le picing in kingaisun uh hi.

Atui ciang tang 2 or 3 bangh tui ngei aa, atuite sia inhik tui taw kibang in ni sawm bangh ciang keuh uh hi.

Ano hong sua ciang mitkhua mu meal ngawl aa, sam nei ngawl uh hi, anu ii noai tawp in, anu in tha 3-4 bangh huai kul hi.
Kumh 10 bangh nungta uh hi, amate ii lau nganhing sia ngul, ngamui vacim ngilo te kiita uh hi.



The male platypus also possesses two small spurs, one on each hind paw. The spurs release enough toxic venom to kill a small animal or be incredibly painful for a human. While this weapon is used against predators if threatened (the platypus would actually rather run than fight), it is primarily used against other male platypuses during mating season. They fight to show dominance and scare away potential mating rivals.
The platypus mating season is between June and October. Around 2 years of age, both male and female platypuses are ready to mate.
After successfully mating, two or three eggs develop in the female. After about a month, the female lays the eggs, which are soft like lizard eggs. She will incubate the eggs by curling around them for 10 days before they hatch. The male will have nothing to do with the eggs or newborns.
Newborn platypuses are helpless. They are blind and hairless. They feed on their mother’s milk, which is expelled through pores on her body. The babies suckle on milk for 3-4 months.

Conservation Status

Platypuses have a lifespan of over 10 years in the wild, but they do face a few threats. They have several natural predators, such as snakes, foxes, and birds of prey. Platypuses are also susceptible to habitat destruction, but that is at a minimum. They are protected from being hunted. As such, their populations are stable, and they are listed as a species of least concern by the IUCN Red List.
- See more at: http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-facts/platypus/#sthash.Aq95no98.dpuf
The male platypus also possesses two small spurs, one on each hind paw. The spurs release enough toxic venom to kill a small animal or be incredibly painful for a human. While this weapon is used against predators if threatened (the platypus would actually rather run than fight), it is primarily used against other male platypuses during mating season. They fight to show dominance and scare away potential mating rivals.
The platypus mating season is between June and October. Around 2 years of age, both male and female platypuses are ready to mate.
After successfully mating, two or three eggs develop in the female. After about a month, the female lays the eggs, which are soft like lizard eggs. She will incubate the eggs by curling around them for 10 days before they hatch. The male will have nothing to do with the eggs or newborns.
Newborn platypuses are helpless. They are blind and hairless. They feed on their mother’s milk, which is expelled through pores on her body. The babies suckle on milk for 3-4 months.

Conservation Status

Platypuses have a lifespan of over 10 years in the wild, but they do face a few threats. They have several natural predators, such as snakes, foxes, and birds of prey. Platypuses are also susceptible to habitat destruction, but that is at a minimum. They are protected from being hunted. As such, their populations are stable, and they are listed as a species of least concern by the IUCN Red List.
- See more at: http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-facts/platypus/#sthash.Aq95no98.dpuf

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